More than 100,000 Coloradans live in mobile homes

Over the past decade, out-of-state investment funds have purchased mobile home parks throughout Colorado and increased the rent on residents, forcing them to make difficult decisions with the resources they have. 

HB22-1287, Protections For Mobile Home Park Residents, is a bill designed to safeguard Colorado’s largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing. Here’s what it will do.

Protect Affordability

 Increase change of use protections and stabilize lot rents to give residents predictability and minimize displacement

Increase Stability

Building on the opportunity to purchase law to give residents better tools to manage their own communities

Strengthen Accountability

Improving the state’s oversight program and the MHPA to keep park landlords accountable

Join our mailing list to stay up-to-date on advocacy opportunities

Play Video

THE CURRENT SITUATION

Imagine owning your home, but the land beneath it is owned by investors in California.

TWEET THIS

For thousands of mobile home owners across our state, this is their everyday reality, and once an investor purchases a mobile home park, they can raise lot rents whenever they want.

“Mobile” is a misnomer for describing today’s manufactured homes. The vast majority serve as permanent housing and are never moved from the original site once installed. It can be extremely expensive to move a mobile home, ranging from $10,000-$20,000 or more, and even more difficult to find another lot to rent. 

Mobile home park | Clear Creek County, CO | Rights For Residents

Endorsements

The following organizations have offered their support of HB22-1287.

FAQ

Frequently asked questions about HB22-1287, mobile homes, and Colorado's 700+ mobile home parks

The terms mobile and manufactured homes have different definitions but are used here interchangeably, as explained by 9to5 Colorado in their concept paper, Opportunity to Purchase: Mobile Homes in Colorado: 

The term “mobile home” refers to housing built before June 1, 1976, when the The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Code went into effect. “Manufactured homes” refer to units that were built after June of 1976 and adhere to different building codes from HUD… 

“Mobile” is a misnomer for describing today’s manufactured homes. The vast majority serve as permanent housing and are never moved from the original site once installed. It can be extremely expensive to move a mobile home, ranging from $10,000-$20,000 or more, and even more difficult to find another lot to rent. 

 

Mobile home parks house thousands of low-income and working families in Colorado. In most cases, homeowners purchase their unit and then rent the lot underneath it. Mobile homes are difficult and expensive to move, and with less and less park options available changing locations is often impossible for residents.

Large, out of state investment funds have taken advantage of Coloradans living in mobile homes. They’ve purchased these parks because they know that when they raise the rent, residents have nowhere else to go. 

Sales to corporate owners and rent increases have not translated into improvements to the park. Instead, these increases have gone straight into the pockets of out-of-state investors. Owners know they can get away with new charges and arbitrary requirements because tenants cannot simply pick up and move.

Before and throughout the pandemic, investment funds have increased the rent at every opportunity, pushing monthly prices up by as much as 80% and forcing countless Colorado households into homelessness. Mobile Home Park residents in Colorado need better protections so they can’t be displaced from the homes they’ve worked so hard for.

The bill is sponsored by Representative Andrew Boesnecker, Representative Edie Hooton, and Senator Faith Winter.

This bill offers critical protections to mobile home park renters.

The proposed bill package offers three categories of improvements to the rights and protections for mobile home park residents:

  1. Protect Affordability: Increase change of use protections and stabilize lot rents to give residents predictability and minimize displacement
  2. Increase Stability: Building on the opportunity to purchase law to give residents better tools to manage their own communities
  3. Strengthen Accountability: Improving the state’s oversight program and the MHPA to keep park landlords accountable